Tibetan Terrier dog breed guide

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Brain Training

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Who knew Tibetan Terrier dogs are not terriers at all. They’re companion or utility dogs – and don’t have any terrier instincts. Discover what they ARE like in this breed profile video presented by canine experts and owner who’s bred TIbetan Terriers since the early 1990s. There’s information on Tibetan temperament and training -and really important advice on grooming requirements for these dogs with long, silky double-coats. It seems they’re suitable for everyone – from young families with children to retired folks. But there’s a serious warning about the consequences of leaving these very sociable dogs home alone. Enjoy the video and – as ever – we’d love to hear your experiences of the Tibetan Terrier dog breed. They think they’re people. No-one has told them they’re dogs. They think they’re people. Every one is an individual character. Some people say I would like a bitch because she’s quiter than a dog – that’s not true, every one is different. I find the males are more comical adn the females perhaps a little more into their owner. Their energy is so fun, they’re bouncy, they’re funny. They’re kind – and they’re just great dogs. They’re a very cute puppy, but they do need a firm hand. They’re determined – they have a determined expression – it’s part of the breed – and once that relationship’s established they’ll do anything for their owners. They are individual little people, they are fabulous little dogs. The Tibetan Terrier, despite its name, isn’t actually a terrier, it’s a member of the utility group and it’s therefore a more glamorous dog if you like. In the showroom they do look particularly glamorous. It’s more of a herding dog. So it’s a smart, clever dog which makes it very easy to train. They’re just a lovely family companion animal – fun loving, lovely nature. You never only own one Tibetan Terrier – they’re very collectable. Tibetan Terriers are real personalities and characters. These lovely little dogs have medium exercise levels and they enjoy a good long walk, but they don’t need the hours of stimulation as some of the working types. We would look to re-home one to somebody who hs the time and energy for them, who also has the time to keep up with their lovely long coats. They come into the bracket of companion animals and that’s exactly what they are. They want to be doing whatever you’re doing. So you could be walking over the Malvern Hills – you could be doing your ironing – as long as they’re with you at your feet, that’s what they want to be doing. It’s not a dog that likes to be separated from its owner so you shouldn’t really think about a Tibetan if you’re going to go out all day because they do suffer from what we call separation anxiety. But if you’re goig to be around for you dog, a Tibetan Terrier makes ideal company. They love a family environment because they do enjoy playing with the kids – they’re also suitable for old people. My Mum a pensioner had two they were company for her. They would not suit a family that was out at work all day or for long hours because they want the companionship, they want the company. Not a dog to be let alone for long periods of time. Two or three hours – fine – but not for an all day. Once they’re adult and once their bones are grown and properly developed, they will take a very substantial amount of exercise, if you want to. They’re also happy for five minutes in the garden, to answer the calls of nature – again they don’t particularly like getting wet or dirty, But the key is they’re doing what you’re doing. So if you’re in the house and you put them in the garden, they’ll just stand at the door – they’ll want to be back in with you. This is Panda. I do junior handling. It’s not about the dog it’s about how you handle the dog. You have to triangles and stay sitting down – and figure of eights just to show the dog and you must not break the golden rule which is getting in between the dog and the judge and the dog. It’s quite hard with the junior handling because the judge moves position – so you have to be watching where the judge is. Most people who keep them for pet animals do not leave them in their full coat. They keep them in a teddy bear or a puppy clip. They still need 5 minutes day to go through the coat. It’s a double coated breed. And once a week a really good groom. Check the nails, teeth, ears. And if you’re keeping the dog in a clip it will probably need the grooming parlour every two months or so. If you keep a dog in full coat like you do with a showdog – my dogs are groomed every week. It’s because they’re full-coated show dogs. The thing you want to be thinking about is this dog has a lot of coat. So even from a young age as a puppy, you want to be handling it, getting it used to being stroked, used to being groomed and see if you can find a nice groomer who will just let you go for visits so it can get used to the environment before you take it.

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Brain Training

Regardless of breed, we highly recommend using Brain Training For Dogs by Adrienne Farricelli’s to develop your pet’s hidden intelligence and natural willingness to improve obedience and behavior.

Visit Site →

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